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Cover of Strategies To Prevent Weight Gain in Adults: Future Research Needs

Strategies To Prevent Weight Gain in Adults: Future Research Needs

Identification of Future Research Needs From Comparative Effectiveness Review No. 97

Future Research Needs Papers, No. 43

Investigators: , MD, MPH, , MPH, CPH, , PhD, , MD, MPH, MBA, and , MD, MPH.

Johns Hopkins University Evidence-based Practice Center
Rockville (MD): Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (US); .
Report No.: 13-EHC083-EF

Structured Abstract

Objective:

To identify and prioritize questions for future research in adult weight gain prevention.

Methods:

We identified potential research needs based on gaps identified from a recent systematic review, and then engaged seven stakeholders to participate in a Delphi process to prioritize PICOTS (populations, interventions, comparisons, outcomes, timing, settings) elements. We then used these results to create research questions, which our stakeholders prioritized.

Results:

Based on consensus, seven questions were of highest priority: (1) To prevent weight gain in all adults, what is the comparative effectiveness of adding physical activity versus not adding physical activity to a work-based self-management and diet intervention? (2) To prevent weight gain in all adults, what is the comparative effectiveness of adding physical activity versus not adding physical activity to a home-based self-management and diet intervention? (3) To prevent weight gain in all adults, what is the comparative effectiveness of a work-based self-management and physical activity intervention versus a self-management and diet intervention? (4) To prevent weight gain in all adults, what is the comparative effectiveness of a home-based self-management and physical activity intervention versus a self-management and diet intervention? (5) To prevent weight gain in overweight (body mass index [BMI] ≥27kg/m2) adults, what is the comparative effectiveness of adding physical activity versus not adding physical activity to a home-based self-management and diet intervention? (6) To prevent weight gain in overweight (BMI ≥27kg/m2) adults, what is the comparative effectiveness of a home-based self-management and physical activity intervention versus a self-management and diet intervention? (7) To prevent weight gain in young adults (age 18–35), what is the comparative effectiveness of adding physical activity versus not adding physical activity to a home-based self-management and diet intervention?

Conclusion:

Stakeholders prioritized strategies to prevent weight gain for all/overweight/young adults in work/home settings, as they may lead to significant benefits from avoiding obesity. Rigorous studies that evaluate high-quality interventions addressing these topics are needed.

540 Gaither Road, Rockville, MD 20850; www​.ahrq.gov

Addendum August 2013

Prepared for: Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services1, Contract No. 290-2007-10061-I. Prepared by: Johns Hopkins University Evidence-based Practice Center, Baltimore, MD

Suggested citation:

Gudzune KA, Lau BD, Hutfless S, Boult C, Segal JB. Strategies To Prevent Weight Gain Among Adults: Future Research Needs. Future Research Needs Paper No. 43. (Prepared by the Johns Hopkins University Evidence-based Practice Center under Contract No. 290-2007-10061-I.) AHRQ Publication No. 13-EHC083-EF. Rockville, MD: Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality; June 2013. Addendum August 2013. www.effectivehealthcare.ahrq.gov.

This report is based on research conducted by the Johns Hopkins University Evidence-based Practice Center (EPC) under contract to the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ), Rockville, MD (Contract No. 290-2007-10061-I). The findings and conclusions in this document are those of the author(s), who are responsible for its contents; the findings and conclusions do not necessarily represent the views of AHRQ. Therefore, no statement in this report should be construed as an official position of AHRQ or of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.

The information in this report is intended to help health care researchers and funders of research make well-informed decisions in designing and funding research and thereby improve the quality of health care services. This report is not intended to be a substitute for the application of scientific judgment. Anyone who makes decisions concerning the provision of clinical care should consider this report in the same way as any medical research and in conjunction with all other pertinent information, i.e., in the context of available resources and circumstances.

None of the investigators have any affiliations or financial involvement that conflicts with the material presented in this report.

1

540 Gaither Road, Rockville, MD 20850; www​.ahrq.gov

Bookshelf ID: NBK154502PMID: 24027797
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