NCBI Bookshelf. A service of the National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health.

National Research Council (US) and Institute of Medicine (US) Committee on State of the Science of Nuclear Medicine. Advancing Nuclear Medicine Through Innovation. Washington (DC): National Academies Press (US); 2007.

Cover of Advancing Nuclear Medicine Through Innovation

Advancing Nuclear Medicine Through Innovation.

Show details

DBiographical Sketches Of Committee Members

Hedvig Hricak, Chair (M.D., University of Zagreb; Ph.D., oncology, Karolinska Institute), is chairman of the Department of Radiology at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center. Her expertise is in diagnostic radiology, particularly as it relates to imaging of genitourinary cancers. Her research studies use a variety of imaging methods including ultrasound, computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, and magnetic resonance imaging spectroscopy with the aim of improving cancer detecion, treatment planning, and follow-up. She was elected to the Institute of Medicine (IOM) in 2002. She received the Marie Curie Award from the Society of Women in Radiology in 2002 and the gold medal from the International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine in 2003. She serves on the National Cancer Institute’s Board of Scientific Advisors, on the Board of Directors of the Radiological Society of North America, and on the IOM’s Committee on Cancer and Cancer Biology. She is an honorary member of the German Radiological Society, the British Institute of Radiology, and the Croatian Academy of Science and Art, and has an honorary doctorate in medicine from the Ludwig Maximilian University of Munich.

S. James Adelstein (M.D., Harvard Medical School; Ph.D., biophysics, Massachusetts Institute of Technology) is the Paul C. Cabot Distinguished Professor of Medical Biophysics at Harvard Medical School and a nuclear medicine specialist. His research interests are focused on the radiation biology and biophysics of internal emitters and the experimental treatment of cancer using radionuclides. He was elected to the Institute of Medicine in 1985. Dr. Adelstein is the vice-chair of the National Academies’ Nuclear and Radiation Studies Board, was chair of the Board on Radiation Effects Research from 2002 to 2005 and has served on numerous National Research Council and IOM committees.

Peter S. Conti (M.D., Cornell University; Ph.D., biophysics, Cornell University) is professor of radiology, pharmacy, and biomedical engineering at the University of Southern California (USC), as well as director of the USC Positron Imaging Science Center and Clinic. He is board certified in nuclear medicine and diagnostic radiology, and his expertise is in the clinical use of positron emission tomography in the diagnosis, staging, and treatment of cancer. In addition, he is interested in the development of new radiolabeled imaging agents. He was the recipient of the Young Investigator Award by the American Society of Clinical Oncology and the postdoctoral award by Johns Hopkins Medical Institute in 1990. He is past president of the Society of Nuclear Medicine.

Joanna Fowler (Ph.D., chemistry, University of Colorado) is a senior chemist at Brookhaven National Laboratory and director of the Brookhaven PET Program. She has had a long-term interest in radiotracer synthesis with positron emitters and new applications of radiotracers in neuroscience. She was elected to the National Academy of Sciences (NAS) in 2003. She is the recipient of the Garvan-Olin Award and the Glen T. Seaborg Award from the American Chemical Society, the Paul Aebersold Award from the Society of Nuclear Medicine, and the E. O. Lawrence Award from the Department of Energy. She served on the NAS Panel on Benchmarking the Research Competitiveness of the U.S. in Chemistry and has served on the Committee on Nuclear and Radiochemistry and on the Board on Chemical Sciences and Technology.

Joe Gray (Ph.D., physics, Kansas State University) holds appointments as associate laboratory director for Life and Environmental Science at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL), director of the Division of Life Sciences at LBNL, and adjunct professor of laboratory medicine and radiation oncology at the University of California at San Francisco (UCSF). He also is program leader for breast oncology in the UCSF Comprehensive Cancer Center and is a member of UCSF’s Program in Biological and Medical Informatics and the Graduate Group in Biophysics. His research interests include the development of analytic techniques in the study of cancer, and his current work focuses on the use of systems approaches to develop strategies to predict individual responses to agents that target signaling pathways regulating proliferation and/or apoptosis. Major awards include the E.O Lawrence Award from the Department of Energy, the Curt Stern Award from the American Society for Human Genetics, and the Leader ship Award from the National Cancer Institute (NCI) Specialized Programs of Research Excellence. He has also served on the Science Council of the Radiation Effects Research Foundation and currently serves on the Board of Scientific Advisors for NCI.

Lin-wen Hu (Ph.D., nuclear engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology) is the associate director for research development and utilization at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology’s Nuclear Reactor Laboratory (NRL). She directs NRL’s research, irradiation services, and outreach activities and is responsible for the development, design, and safety reviews of major reactor experiments. In addition, she supervises NRL’s radiochemistry laboratory, which specializes in trace elements analysis in biological samples. Her areas of expertise include research reactor applications and instrumental neutron activation for medical and environmental research. She has served as chair of the American Nuclear Society’s isotopes and radiation division, which is devoted to applying nuclear engineering technologies related to isotopes and radiation in scientific research and medicine and industry.

Joel Karp (Ph.D., physics, Massachusetts Institute of Technology) is professor of radiology, the chief of the Physics and Instrumentation Research Section in the Department of Radiology, and director of the Department of Radiology PET Center at the University of Pennsylvania. His research interests focus on positron emission tomography (PET) instrumentation design, which includes development of scintillation detectors, data correction techniques, 3-dimensional image reconstruction algorithms, and evaluation of imaging performance for human and animal imaging studies. He has chaired the Institute of Electrical and Electronic Engineers (IEEE) Nuclear Medical and Imaging Sciences Council, and the Society of Nuclear Medicine PET Standards Committee. In addition, he is currently senior editor of IEEE Transactions on Nuclear Science—Nuclear Medical Imaging Sciences.

Thomas Lewellen (Ph.D., experimental nuclear physics, University of Washington) is professor of radiology, adjunct professor of electrical engineering, and director of physics and instrumentation development in nuclear medicine at the University of Washington. His research interests include the development of small animal PET systems and improving imaging capabilities for single photon emission computed tomography, PET, and PET/CT scanners for clinical use. He is a senior member of the Institute of Electrical and Electronic Engineers and the recipient of the Bronze Medal Award for Physics from the Society of Nuclear Medicine, the Innovative Technology Award from National Aeronautics and Space Administration, and the Distinguished Scientist Award from the Western Regional Society of Nuclear Medicine.

Roger Macklis (M.D., Harvard Medical School) is professor of medicine at the Cleveland Clinic Lerner College of Medicine. His expertise is in radiation oncology, and his major research interests include biologically targeted radiopharmaceutical therapy, pediatric radiation oncology, and clinical research in breast cancer, lymphomas, and brain tumor radiotherapy. He has received the Young Investigator Award from the American Society of Clinical Oncology, Resident Research Award from the American Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology, and the Junior Faculty Research Award from the American Cancer Society, among other honors. He has served as radiation oncology representative for the National Wilms’ Tumor Study Group and currently serves as an examiner for the American Board of Radiology.

C. Douglas Maynard (M.D., Wake Forest University School of Medicine) is the former chairman of the Radiology Department at Wake Forest University School of Medicine and is currently professor emeritus of radiology. His expertise is in diagnostic radiology (nuclear medicine), with a special interest in the applications of engineering to medical imaging. In this capacity, he helped establish the National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering at the National Institutes of Health. He has also served as past president of the Academy of Radiology Research, the Radiological Society of North America, the American Board of Radiology, and the Society of Nuclear Medicine. In addition, he was awarded the Medallion of Merit, the highest honor bestowed from Wake Forest University, in 2002.

Thomas Ruth (Ph.D., nuclear spectroscopy, Clark University) is director of the PET Program at the University of British Columbia. He is a leader in the production and application of radioisotopes for research in the physical and biological sciences. His efforts at establishing PET as a quantitative tool for in vivo biochemistry has been recognized by the Canadian Nuclear Medicine Society’s highest award of Meritorious Status. He has served on a multitude of committees, including the National Research Council’s Committee on Medical Isotope Production.

Heinrich Schelbert (M.D., University of Würzburg; Ph.D., biology, University of Würzburg) is the George V. Taplin Professor at the David Geffen School of Medicine of the University of California at Los Angeles. He is also an attending of the clinical nuclear medicine service. His research interests focus on the development and validation of noninvasive radionuclide imaging techniques for the study of cardiovascular function. He has received the Distinguished Scientific Achievement Award from the American Heart Association, the Distinguished Clinical Scientist Award from the Academy of Molecular Imaging, and is a two-time recipient of the Georg von Hevesy Prize by the World Federation of Nuclear Medicine and Biology. In addition, he is currently the editor-in-chief of the Journal of Nuclear Medicine.

Gustav von Schulthess (M.D., Harvard Medical School; Ph.D., physics, Massachusetts Institute of Technology) is professor of nuclear medicine at the University Hospital of Zurich and was previously a visiting professor in the Department of Radiology at Stanford University. His research interests include the clinical applicability of combined positron emission tomography (PET) and computed tomography (CT), or PET/CT, particularly as it relates to tumor imaging. He has received the Seroussi Memorial Award and a research award from the Swiss Radiological Society.

Michael R. Zalutsky (Ph.D., nuclear chemistry, Washington University) is professor of radiology, professor of biomedical engineering, and associate professor of pathology at Duke University Medical Center. His expertise is in radiology, particularly as it relates to antibody therapy. His primary research interest is developing novel radioactive compounds for improving the diagnosis and treatment of cancer. Honors he has received include the Berson-Yalow Award from the Society of Nuclear Medicine in 2005, the MERIT (Method to Extend Research in Time) Award from the National Cancer Institute, and the Wilhelm Manchot Visiting Professorship at Technische Universität Munich. He has served on the National Institutes of Health’s special study sections, such as in radiotherapeutic applications, radiolabeled antibodies for breast cancer, and radiation oncology applications, and is a reviewer for proposals on nuclear medicine for the Department of Energy.

Copyright © 2007, National Academy of Sciences.
Bookshelf ID: NBK11461
PubReader format: click here to try

Views

Recent Activity

Your browsing activity is empty.

Activity recording is turned off.

Turn recording back on

See more...