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BOX 6-1Selected Universal Design and Other Features for Health Care Facilities

  • Protection from the weather at entrance doors
  • Power door mechanisms at interior and exterior entrances
  • Spaces in waiting areas where wheelchair users can sit out of traffic lanes but with other people
  • Chairs for use by people who cannot stand while transacting business
  • Chairs that can be set at different heights for use by children, adults, and older people, some equipped with armrests for those who need assistance rising to their feet
  • Weight scales that allow people with difficulty standing to hold on, and weight scales that allow people to be weighed while they are sitting in a wheelchair
  • Motorized, adjustable-height treatment and physical examination tables and chairs
  • Mammography machines that can be used for a woman in a seated position
  • A portable, amplified communications system or device with volume control at service desks and treatment spaces for people who are hard of hearing
  • More than one accessible toilet and dressing room, with some left-handed and some right-handed
  • A TTY for use by people who are deaf to make phone calls from health care facilities*
  • Staff awareness and training in using the telephone relay systems*
  • Awareness and sensitivity training for all staff and professional personnel on interacting with people with disabilities

SOURCE: Center for Universal Design and North Carolina Office on Disability and Health (undated).

*

Originally, TTY stood for “text teletypewriter,” but today the abbreviation is more often explained as “text telephone,” a device that allows those with hearing or speech impairments to type and read messages sent over telephone lines. These devices are also called TDDs (as in the Americans with Disabilities Act) for “telecommunications device for the deaf.” A telephone relay system usually involves an operator who reads typed messages to and types voice messages from telephone users who do not have hearing impairments. For further discussion, see Appendix F of this report.

Originally, TTY stood for “text teletypewriter,” but today the abbreviation is more often explained as “text telephone,” a device that allows those with hearing or speech impairments to type and read messages sent over telephone lines. These devices are also called TDDs (as in the Americans with Disabilities Act) for “telecommunications device for the deaf.” A telephone relay system usually involves an operator who reads typed messages to and types voice messages from telephone users who do not have hearing impairments. For further discussion, see Appendix F of this report.

From: 6, The Environmental Context of Disability: The Case of Health Care Facilities

Cover of The Future of Disability in America
The Future of Disability in America.
Institute of Medicine (US) Committee on Disability in America; Field MJ, Jette AM, editors.
Washington (DC): National Academies Press (US); 2007.
Copyright © 2007, National Academy of Sciences.

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