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TABLE 9-9Food Groups Providing Vitamin B12 in the Diets of U.S. Men or Women Aged 10 Years and Older, CSFII, 1995a

Food GroupContribution to Total B12 Intakeb (%)Foods Within the Group that Provide at Least 1 μg of B12c per Serving
MenWomen1–2 μg> 2 μg
Food groups providing at least 5% of total vitamin B12 intake
Mixed foodsd18.516.4NAeNA
Beef15.012.0Beef
Milk and milk drinks10.614.6Plain and flavored yogurtf
Shellfish9.44.9Crayfish and scallopsClams, oysters, mussels, crab, and lobster
Mixed foods, main ingredient is grain7.15.7NANA
Processed meatsg7.05.0
Organ meats5.56.9Liver, kidney, heart, brains, and tongue
Ready-to-eat cereals4.78.2Moderately fortifiedHighly fortified
Finfish3.45.7Catfish, pike, whiting, perch, swordfish, carp, porgy, and flounderHerring, sardines, trout, mackerel, salmon, and canned tuna
Vitamin B12 from other food groups
Lamb, veal, game, and other carcass meat0.80.8Lamb and vealVenison, rabbit, and squirrel
Soy-based supplements and meal replacements0.70.2Soy-based meat substitutes
a

CSFII = Continuing Survey of Food Intakes by Individuals.

b

Contribution to total intake reflects both the concentration of the nutrient in the food and the amount of the food consumed. It refers to the percentage contribution to the American diet for both men and women, based on 1995 CSFII data.

c

1 μg represents 20% of the Recommended Daily Intake (6.0 μg) of B12—a value set by the Food and Drug Administration.

d

Includes sandwiches and other foods with meat, poultry, or fish as the main ingredient.

e

NA = not applicable. Mixed foods were not considered for this table.

f

Whole, low fat, and nonfat.

g

Includes frankfurters, sausages, lunch meats, and meat spreads.

SOURCE: Unpublished data from the Food Surveys Research Group, Agricultural Research Service, U.S. Department of Agriculture, 1997.

CSFII = Continuing Survey of Food Intakes by Individuals.

Contribution to total intake reflects both the concentration of the nutrient in the food and the amount of the food consumed. It refers to the percentage contribution to the American diet for both men and women, based on 1995 CSFII data.

1 μg represents 20% of the Recommended Daily Intake (6.0 μg) of B12—a value set by the Food and Drug Administration.

Includes sandwiches and other foods with meat, poultry, or fish as the main ingredient.

NA = not applicable. Mixed foods were not considered for this table.

Whole, low fat, and nonfat.

Includes frankfurters, sausages, lunch meats, and meat spreads.

From: 9, Vitamin B12

Cover of Dietary Reference Intakes for Thiamin, Riboflavin, Niacin, Vitamin B6, Folate, Vitamin B12, Pantothenic Acid, Biotin, and Choline
Dietary Reference Intakes for Thiamin, Riboflavin, Niacin, Vitamin B6, Folate, Vitamin B12, Pantothenic Acid, Biotin, and Choline.
Institute of Medicine (US) Standing Committee on the Scientific Evaluation of Dietary Reference Intakes and its Panel on Folate, Other B Vitamins, and Choline.
Washington (DC): National Academies Press (US); 1998.
Copyright © 1998, National Academy of Sciences.

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