TABLE 3.2Current Estimates of Chimpanzees in Six Colonies by Subgroup and Cost

SubgroupsCurrent NumberCurrent Annual Cost at $20 per day
A. Breeders and offspringa573$4,182,900
B. Available for researchb549$4,007,700
C. Currently on research protocolsb360$2,628,000
Subtotal1,482$10,818,600
D-1. Breeding colony and offspring not needed for breeding or research—candidates for sanctuariesc?(included in above categories)
D-2. Used in research but not posing public health threat—candidates for sanctuariesc?(included in above categories)
D-3. Used in research and posing a public health threat—candidates for nonsanctuary long-term cared260$1,898,000
Subtotal1,742
Adjusted for double count in several categories<248>
Total1,494$10,906,200
a

Category A consists of 325 animals of mixed ages from the initial 1986 NIH breeding program, 121 offspring ranging in age from infancy to 10-yr, and 127 offspring produced and available for research but currently supported by NIH under the breeding program. The 573 figure includes 35 animals from an institution not supported under the NIH breeding program.

b

As reported to ISIS in survey dated September 1996.

c

Unknown. See projections for number of animals not needed for breeding in Chapter 4.

d

As reported to the committee by the six major institutions holding chimpanzees primarily for hepatitis B virus and HIV protocols. It is likely that an additional 100 to 150 animals have been used in hepatitis C virus, malaria, kuru, and Creutzfeldt-Jakob and other infectious protocols. See Chapter 2.

Category A consists of 325 animals of mixed ages from the initial 1986 NIH breeding program, 121 offspring ranging in age from infancy to 10-yr, and 127 offspring produced and available for research but currently supported by NIH under the breeding program. The 573 figure includes 35 animals from an institution not supported under the NIH breeding program.

As reported to ISIS in survey dated September 1996.

Unknown. See projections for number of animals not needed for breeding in Chapter 4.

As reported to the committee by the six major institutions holding chimpanzees primarily for hepatitis B virus and HIV protocols. It is likely that an additional 100 to 150 animals have been used in hepatitis C virus, malaria, kuru, and Creutzfeldt-Jakob and other infectious protocols. See Chapter 2.

From: 3, LONG-TERM CARE

Cover of Chimpanzees in Research
Chimpanzees in Research: Strategies for Their Ethical Care, Management, and Use.
National Research Council (US) Committee on Long-Term Care of Chimpanzees.
Washington (DC): National Academies Press (US); 1997.
Copyright © 1997, National Academy of Sciences.

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