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Transitioning from LocusLink to Entrez Gene

Cancer Chromosomes: a New Entrez Database

HomoloGene: An Entrez Database with a New Look

BLAST Link (BLink) to Protein Alignments and Structures

Debut of the HCT Database and Anthropology/Allele Frequencies in dbMHC

350kb Sequence Length Limit Removed by Sequence Database Collaboration

New Eukaryotic Genomes at NCBI

Environmental Samples Make Big Splash

HIV Protein-Interaction Database

e-PCR and Reverse e-PCR: Greater Sensitivity, More Options

New Organisms in UniGene

RefSeq Accession Numbers Get Longer as Rat Gets Last 6-digit Accession

Slots available for FieldGuidePlus Training Course Onsite at NCBI

RefSeq Release 6 on FTP Site

Exponential Growth of GenBank Continues with Release 142

Entrez Tools is a 'Hot Spot'

BLAST Lab: Using BLASTClust

New Microbial Genomes in GenBank

Entrez Quiz

Masthead





Exponential Growth of GenBank Continues with Release 142

Over the past decade, the growth of GenBank has followed an exponential curve with a doubling time of between 12 and 15 months. As shown in Figure 1, the trend continues with release 142 for which close-of-data was June 16.

Figure 1: Growth of GenBank in billions of base pairs from release 3 in April of 1994 to the current release, 142.

In the eight week period between the close dates for GenBank releases 141.0 and 142.0, the non-WGS portion of GenBank grew by 1,335,978,783 base pairs and by 1,855,785 sequence records. The number of base pairs of sequence in release 142 for several organisms of interest is shown in Figure 2.

Figure 2 : Number of base pairs of sequence in GenBank release 142 for selected organisms.

GenBank release 142 is available on the NCBI FTP site and at two mirror sites.

Primary FTP site at NCBI:
ftp.ncbi.nih.gov/genbank

San Diego SuperComputer Center mirror:
genbank.sdsc.edu/pub

Indiana University mirror:

bio-mirror.net/biomirror/genbank

Uncompressed, the Release 142.0 flatfiles require approximately 136 gigabytes while the more compact ASN.1 version requires 119 gigabytes.

Continue to:  eukaryotic

NCBI News | Fall/Winter 2002 NCBI News: Spring 2003